25 Words That Are Interpreted Differently In West Virginia

1. Ma’am/Sir

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Source: wifflegif.com

What it means everywhere else: What you call customers when you’re working in the service industry and they are clearly your elders.
What it means in West Virginia: What you call literally anyone you don’t know extremely well out of respect. It essentially functions like the formal usted in Spanish.

2. Poke

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Source: WordPress user landonhowell

What it means everywhere else: To jab someone with a finger, or to do the most annoying thing you can possibly do on Facebook (including all of those Farmville invites).
What it means in West Virginia: Just another way of saying grocery bag.

3. Peck

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Source: pandawhale.com

What it means everywhere else: A brief and often platonic kiss.
What it means in West Virginia: A considerable amount. You really don’t want to hear that you’re in “a peck of trouble,” because that means you’re definitely in some serious trouble.

4. Molasses

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Source: Tumblr user imperialbedrooms

What it means everywhere else: A syrupy by-product of turning sugarcane into sugar.
What it means in West Virginia: Something that’s moving way too slowly.

5. Pepperoni Rolls

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Source: Flickr user notbrucelee

What it means everywhere else: What, you mean like those pizza roll things?
What it means in West Virginia: The most delicious food in the entire world, and literally what you would eat every day for the rest of your life if you could.

6. Coleslaw

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Source: Flickr user stuart_spivack

What it means everywhere else: A cabbage-based side dish.
What it means in West Virginia: A condiment that you’ll put on just about anything, but especially hot dogs.

7. Redneck

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Source; Flickr user Nottsexminer

What it means everywhere else: A derogatory term for uneducated or working class southerners.
What it means in West Virginia: A term that was literally appropriated by the United Mine Workers union when they tied red bandanas around their necks to fight for safer working conditions for not just West Virginian coal miners, but miners everywhere.

8. Buggy

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Source: wifflegif.com

What it means everywhere else: Something a horse pulls around and people sit in.
What it means in West Virginia: What you put your groceries in and push around in the store.

9. Hunting

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Source: Flickr user diamondbackcovers

What it means everywhere else: A hobby that involves shooting game for sport or for food.
What it means in West Virginia: Something your parents have pulled you out of school for at least once as a kid.

10. Blinked

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Source: Flickr user calliope

What it means everywhere else: When someone closed and opened their eyes.
What it means in West Virginia: What you call milk when it’s gone sour.

11. Herd

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Source: Marshall University Athletics Facebook

What it means everywhere else: A large group of animals.
What it means in West Virginia: The best college football team ever.

12. Holler

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Source: Flickr user dougtone

What it means everywhere else: To shout or cry out.
What it means in West Virginia: A unit of measurement when talking about distance. For example, “It’s a hoot and a holler away.”

13. Spell

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Source: Flickr user dionhinchcliffe

What it means everywhere else: A magical incantation or ritual that makes something fantastical happen.
What it means in West Virginia: An undetermined amount of time. (When a West Virginian grandmother asks you to sit for “a spell” and talk, it can be determined that it’s going to be awhile.)

14. Scolding

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Source: Flickr user littlesister

What it means everywhere else: What your parents do when you misbehave as a child.
What it means in West Virginia: When your parents threaten you with a switchin’ or a trip to Pruntytown or another correctional facility when you misbehave as a child.

15. Crick

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Source: Flickr user PBoGS

What it means everywhere else: A painful thing you get in your neck if you sleep on it wrong.
What it means in West Virginia: The proper way to say “creek.” Also, a common landmark when giving directions.

16. Red

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Source: Flickr user garlandcannon

What it means everywhere else: One of the three primary colors.
What it means in West Virginia: When followed by “up” it’s the equivalent of clean. For example, to “red up” your room means tidy up your room.

17. Mess

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Source: Flickr user rpavich

What it means everywhere else: Something that’s dirty or chaotic.
What it means in West Virginia: A unit of measurement, meaning a whole lot of something. For example, a lot of chicken wings would be a “whole mess of chicken wings.”

18. Fixing

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Source: quickmeme.com

What it means everywhere else: To repair something that’s broken.
What it means in West Virginia: The G is usually dropped, but it means “about to.” If you’re fixin’ to make dinner, you’re not actually making it yet—you’re just going to make dinner in the near future.

19. Ramps

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Source: Flickr user hpdpro

What it means everywhere else: Slopes that join different levels, and a more accessible alternative to stairs.
What it means in West Virginia: What you call every kind of onion.

20. ‘Mater

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Source: Flickr user Digital Sextant

What it means everywhere else: A character in the Pixar movie Cars.
What it means in West Virginia: A tomato, or, in the correct West Virginian pronunciation, tomater.

21. Coal

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Source: Flickr user americaspower

What it means everywhere else: A source of energy, and something that’s always paired with the buzzword “clean.”
What it means in West Virginia: What at least one person you know (if not many more) makes their living mining.

22. Tudors

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Source: Tudor’s Biscuit World via Facebook

What it means everywhere else: A royal house, an architectural style, and a steamy Showtime series.
What it means in West Virginia: Tudor’s Biscuit World AKA the best breakfast food ever.

23. Cornbread

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Source: Flickr user jeffreyww

What it means everywhere else: A delicious southern bread and standby comfort food.
What it means in West Virginia: What you use to sop up your pinto beans.

24. Organ

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Source: Organ Cave Tours Facebook

What it means everywhere else: A part of your body that serves a specific function, like the heart or lungs.
What it means in West Virginia: Literally the coolest cave you’ve ever seen.

25. Y’all

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Source: WordPress user walktorio2016

What it means everywhere else: A southern expression that’s the equivalent of “you all” or “you guys.”
What it means in West Virginia: The most used word in your entire vocabulary.

20 Words That Have A Different Meaning In The Midwest

Anonymous Sports Betting

A lot of these work for West Virginia also!

1. Winter

What it means everywhere else: A season lasting from mid-December to early March.What it means in the Midwest: A literal hell that will possibly never end, usually starting around Halloween and going until April.

What it means everywhere else: A season lasting from mid-Decemberto early March.

What it means in the Midwest: A literal hell that will possibly never end, usually starting around Halloween and going until April.

2. Pop

What it means everywhere else: A sound, maybe what you do to a pimple or a blister. What it means in the Midwest: A carbonated beverage that tastes yummy in your tummy.

What it means everywhere else: A sound, maybe what you do to a pimple or a blister.

What it means in the Midwest: A carbonated beverage that tastes yummy in your tummy.

3. Lakes

What it means everywhere else: A body of water. What it means in the Midwest: The best swimming pool.

 

What it means everywhere else: A body of water.

What it means in the Midwest: The best swimming pool.

4. Manners

What it means everywhere else: If you make eye contact with someone and possibly smile, your manners are outta this world. What it means in the Midwest: People going out of their way to hold open doors, smile at you, and sometimes even * gasp * talk to you.

 

What it means everywhere else: If you make eye contact with someone and possibly smile, your manners are outta this world.

What it means in the Midwest: People going out of their way to hold open doors, smile at you, and sometimes even * gasp * talk to you.

5. Cornhole

What it means everywhere else: Something people tell you to shut.What it means in the Midwest: The best game to play at family reunions, barbecues, tailgates, basically anywhere.

 

What it means everywhere else: Something people tell you to shut.

What it means in the Midwest: The best game to play at family reunions, barbecues, tailgates, basically anywhere.

6. Basketball

What it means everywhere else: A sport that involves an orange ball. Winter season sport. What it means in the Midwest: A lifestyle. A season that never truly ends.

 

What it means everywhere else: A sport that involves an orange ball. Winter season sport.

What it means in the Midwest: A lifestyle. A season that never truly ends.

7. Missing Headlight

What it means everywhere else: When the headlight on a car is burnt out.What it means in the Midwest: A damn race to be the first to scream out "PADIDDLE" and touch the ceiling of the car.

 

What it means everywhere else: When the headlight on a car is burnt out.

What it means in the Midwest: A damn race to be the first to scream out “PADIDDLE” and touch the ceiling of the car.

8. Spring

What it means everywhere else: A season that starts in mid-March that brings pretty flowers and weather and birds.What it means in the Midwest: A season that hopefully shows up in May.

 

What it means everywhere else: A season that starts in mid-March that brings pretty flowers and weather and birds.

What it means in the Midwest: A season that hopefully shows up in May.

9. Ladybugs

What it means everywhere else: A bug that has spots. Kind of cute.What it means in the Midwest: The literal devil that smells terrible when burnt.

 

What it means everywhere else: A bug that has spots. Kind of cute.

What it means in the Midwest: The literal devil that smells terrible when burnt.

10. Beach

What it means everywhere else: A mass of sand accompanying an ocean.What it means in the Midwest: Sand around a lake. Or rocks. We aren\'t very picky.

 

What it means everywhere else: A mass of sand accompanying an ocean.

What it means in the Midwest: Sand around a lake. Or rocks. We aren\’t very picky.

11. Ice

What it means everywhere else: Frozen water.What it means in the Midwest: The subject of most of your nightmares during the winter months. Going someplace? Give yourself AT LEAST an hour to account for ice.

 

What it means everywhere else: Frozen water.

What it means in the Midwest: The subject of most of your nightmares during the winter months. Going someplace? Give yourself AT LEAST an hour to account for ice.

12. Ranch Dressing

What it means everywhere else: A popular salad dressing.What it means in the Midwest: THE NECTAR OF GODS. THE REASON TO LIVE.

 

What it means everywhere else: A popular salad dressing.

What it means in the Midwest: THE NECTAR OF GODS. THE REASON TO LIVE.

13. Snow Days

What it means everywhere else: A day off school if there\'s snow falling from the sky.What it means in the Midwest: Something that likely won\'t happen unless there are at least 3 feet of snow.

 

What it means everywhere else: A day off school if there\’s snow falling from the sky.

What it means in the Midwest: Something that likely won\’t happen unless there are at least 3 feet of snow.

14. Fair

What it means everywhere else: An adjective to describe something usually as being honorable or just.What it means in the Midwest: The best part of summer with corn dogs and the magic of Lemon Shake-Ups.

 

What it means everywhere else: An adjective to describe something usually as being honorable or just.

What it means in the Midwest: The best part of summer with corn dogs and the magic of Lemon Shake-Ups.

15. Pizza

What it means everywhere else: A delicious food.What it means in the Midwest: DEEP. DISH.

 

What it means everywhere else: A delicious food.

What it means in the Midwest: DEEP. DISH.

16. Ohio State

What it means everywhere else: A college.What it means in the Midwest: THE enemy. Unless of course you go there, in which case it is THE university.

 

What it means everywhere else: A college.

What it means in the Midwest: THE enemy. Unless of course you go there, in which case it is THE university. See Also – EAT SHIT PITT!

17. Puppy Chow

What it means everywhere else: Food for puppies. What it means everywhere in the Midwest: The best snack in the world.

 

What it means everywhere else: Food for puppies.

What it means everywhere in the Midwest: The best snack in the world.

18. Cheese

What it means everywhere else: A dairy product that tastes delicious.What it means in the Midwest: A fan base.

 

What it means everywhere else: A dairy product that tastes delicious.

What it means in the Midwest: A fan base.

19. Shorts Weather

What it means everywhere else: Warm summer days of above 70 degrees.What it means in the Midwest: 40 degrees.

 

What it means everywhere else: Warm summer days of above 70 degrees.

What it means in the Midwest: 40 degrees.

20. Midwest

What it means everywhere else: A collection of states in Middle America.What it means in the Midwest: The best damn place in the world.

 

What it means everywhere else: A collection of states in Middle America.

What it means in the Midwest: The best damn place in the world.

Why I Took My 7-Year-Old to a Tattoo Parlor

Last month, following a long period of girlish cajoling, my daughter finally got her ears pierced in celebration of her 7th birthday. The setting was not the traditional mall kiosk staffed by some bored and minimally trained 16-year-old. Instead I took my daughter to a tattoo parlor.

Surprised they even allow 7-year-olds in those kinds of places? Think again. A growing number of parents are apparently turning to tattoo parlors to bejewel their children’s little lobes. I didn’t come up with this crazy idea out of the blue; I’m a reporter, after all: I researched where to take Shira and weighed the pros and cons. I found that tattoo parlors — despite the blaring heavy metal music — were mom-approved by a local parenting email list. When even a nurse cast her vote in favor of the tattoo parlor, I deliberated no longer.

“There is a stigma attached to tattoo parlors that they’re dirty and will be bombarded by foul-mouthed people,” says Sarah LaRoe, a mom with multiple facial piercings and tattoos creeping up her neck, who pierced my little girl’s ears so tenderly that she left her not in tears but with a big, happy smile on her face.

Contrary to what you might think, tattoo parlors — at least the one I went to — are actually bastions of cleanliness. Some states regulate them, and reputable ones use disposable needles and sterilize all their equipment in an autoclave. In contrast, mall piercers and many jewelry stores use piercing guns that have been associated with complications and can’t be completely sterilized. Armed with that knowledge, which would you choose?

While some parents might be freaked out by the idea of taking their kid to a tattoo parlor, I looked upon the outing as an adventure, joking with my daughter about getting a Hello Kitty tattoo for mom. What I didn’t expect was that the experience would evolve into a lesson in tolerance. In that unnerving way little kids have of speaking their mind, Shira took an initial look at LaRoe and stage-whispered: “I think she looks ugly like that.”

I immediately flashed her my scary mom eyes to signal her to clam up. But later, after we’d left the store, her comment served as an opportunity to point out that just because someone looks different, it doesn’t mean she’s not a good person. LaRoe, regardless of her unconventional piercings, was super-professional and extremely kind.

For professional piercers like LaRoe, who stick needles through noses, eyebrows, tongues and nether regions, ears are the most mundane of piercing locations. But that doesn’t mean they don’t take it seriously. LaRoe spent nearly an hour with us, versus the quick in-and-out that I remember from getting my ears pierced at the mall as a girl. Before leading us into the piercing room — which looked just like a doctor’s office — LaRoe handed the birthday girl a bag with a lollipop, which expertly distracted Shira from being overly nervous about what was going on.

The bag also contained non-iodized sea salt and instructions for mom on how to mix a saline solution to clean newly pierced ears. Unlike the alcohol that mall kiosks recommend for cleaning, salty water doesn’t burn.

Now for the gory details: at tattoo parlors, piercers use hypodermic needles to core out a sliver of skin, making room for an earring — a relatively painless procedure. In contrast, at the mall, the piercer uses a gun that painfully jams a blunt-tipped earring stud into the ear lobe; the process does not remove skin, but effectively pushes it aside.

LaRoe is so convinced of the superiority of needles over piercing guns that she’s signed petitions to ban the guns; one such petition makes the case that “only cowboys use guns.” In her quest to reform the ear-piercing industry, LaRoe leaves her business card at schools and pediatricians’ offices. When she takes her own son to the doctor, she’ll frequently get questions about her multiple piercings; sometimes she gets customers that way too.

Ultimately, though, change starts parent by parent, through word of mouth. “It kind of acts like a trendsetter,” says LaRoe. “All it takes is one little girl who goes to school and says it didn’t hurt.”

It didn’t hurt? Well, maybe a little. But so little that Shira didn’t even blink when LaRoe pierced her first ear. During the procedure, LaRoe had her do some deep, yoga-like breathing, which Shira is familiar with from her weekly yoga class. In and out, in — pierce! Of course, the lollipop helped too.

via time