You Can Live Forever, But There Is A Cost

Anonymous Sports Betting

Live ForeverI’ve got an interesting question (at least, to me) to pose for you.

Here’s the situation:

You can live forever. The catch is: you must murder one person per year you intend to stay alive.

For example: At thirty years of age, you take the deal. Your physical age is frozen at 30. For every year you live, you must take one human life. If you don’t kill within that year, you die. Multiple killings will do you no good. It has to be at least ONE per year.

Would you do it?

Being a big fan of Stephen King, I would love to see him work this into a book. He could make it a great story!

Personally, I think I’d do it, until I got tired of living.

There are just so many people that need killing, I don’t see the problem.
Child molesters, murderers, rapists, drug rehabs, people who don’t use blinkers, the list goes on and on.

Obviously, my answer says a lot about me. What about you?

Mayogarita

mayogarita.jpgOh my God, this sounds so disgusting.

“Mayogarita”, a white drink with a hint of the creamy dressing, is one of several cocktails Nakamura serves in his “Mayonnaise Kitchen” restaurant in suburban Tokyo, which features mayonnaise on everything from toast and spaghetti to fondue.

Despite its Western heritage, mayonnaise has become the condiment of choice for many young Japanese, who add it to everything from sushi, noodles and tempura.

While older Japanese might gag at the thought of mayonnaise on rice or savory pancakes, the young are slathering it on. They even have a name for mayo fanatics: “mayolers”.

Nakamura’s tiny restaurant, with fewer than a dozen tables and decorated with cut-outs shaped like mayonnaise bottles, also offers “Mayoty Dog”, which tastes like the vodka-based cocktail Salty Dog but is served in a glass with mayonnaise on its rim instead of salt.

Patrons of the seven-year-old restaurant can buy their own bottle of mayonnaise for 300 yen ($2.53) — similar to bars that keep regular customers’ bottles of whisky or sake.

Thanks, but no thanks. I would rather spend my money on truck accessories.